Tuesday, 10 April 2012

Self seeded or self sown vegetables

Vegetable gardeners spend time deciding on the ideal time and conditions to plant crops yet this pea self seeded and has grown into a healthy looking plant.

This got me thinking as to whether I should allow more vegetables to go to seed and self sow themselves. Self sowing would most likely gradually produce seeds which are adapted to the local conditions and soil. I have previously had success with self-seeded lettuce, tomatoes, New Zealand spinach, potatoes and legumes but have read that okra, marrows and onions also readily and successfully self-seed. We recently had a crop of rocket after ants had carried rocket seeds from rocket plants which had gone to seed to another part of the garden.

Self- sowing still entails some work to thin out any overcrowded crops or transplant the excess plants to other vegetable beds or give to friends.

What an easy way to garden, no storing of seeds or sowing  - just allow the seeds to remain dormant in the soil until the ideal conditions permit germination. Well worth a go and could also work well with herbs and flowers such as basil, marigolds, dill and poppies.

2 comments:

  1. This is an interesting concept. But can it be integrated with the concept of crops rotation?

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  2. Difficult, but I suppose many self sown plants could be transplanted

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